Flight Simulators

Completing part of your training in a FAA approved Flight Training Device is an economical and valuable way to accelerate your flight training. Aside from being able to train when the weather is bad, or while an airplane is in maintenance, and costing about half as much, simulators excel during procedures training!  A student can fly more approaches per hour in a Flight Training Device than they could ever dream of doing in the actual airplane. The weather is always just what you need.  You can do things you would never attempt in an airplane, and you are never vectored all over the countryside to make room for an inbound airliner.

 

John Wrycza, ASEL, SES, Instrument Airplane writes:  “Wanda’s pre-checkride IFR accelerated training included 20+ hours of mostly IMC – yeah the white stuff in a RedBird FMX full motion simulator (182rg, w/Garmin 530/430) – it’s a real sim – top-of-the-line $70,000 3 axis movement – rock & roll along with 200º field of view 6 LCD screen experience will indeed give you vertigo upon entering the clouds on climbout. At roughly ½ the price of the real airplane, and the effective & efficient side-effects of being able to PAUSE the flight and/or takeoff mid-air, on approach, etc – IFR CHECKRIDES can be accomplished in the RedBird minus the circle-to-land; its EASIER to fly the airplane after flying RedBird.  There’s value/time savings of not having to pre-flight, runup, re-fuel, wear headsets or deal with weather  – and the cockpit is HUGE.”  The Redbird rents for $55.00 / hour.  For more information, please visit the Redbird website.


ELITE Pro BATD

Additionally, we have an Elite BATD, Basic Aviation Training Device.  This sim can be used for 2.5 hours towards the Private Pilot Certificate, 10 hours towards the Instrument Rating and 50 hours towards the Commercial Certificate.  It is also legal to maintain Instrument currency (see specifics below) without an instructor.  The BATD rents for $30.00/ Hour.


LOGGED FLIGHT EXPERIENCE:

Many people are surprised by just how much time spent in FAA approved devices can go directly into your logbook.  Below are just some of the ways you can get ahead by learning to fly with us:

  • Logged Flight Experience Section 61.51(b)(3). (b) Logbook entries. For the purposes of meeting the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section, each person must enter the following information for each flight or lesson logged: (3) Conditions of flight (i) Day or night. (ii) Actual instrument. (iii) Simulated instrument conditions in flight, a flight simulator, or a flight training device or aviation training device. 61.51 (4). A person can use time in a flight simulator, flight training device, or aviation training device for acquiring instrument aeronautical experience for a pilot certificate, rating, or instrument recency experience, provided an authorized instructor is present to observe that time and signs the person’s logbook or training record to verify the time and the content of the training session.
  • Instrument experience Section 61.57(c)(1). (c) Instrument experience. Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, a person may act as pilot in command under IFR or weather conditions less than the minimums prescribed for VFR only if:
  • Log 2.5 Hrs towards the Private Pilot Certificate Section 61.109(k)(l). (k) Permitted credit for use of a flight simulator or flight training device. (1) Except as provided in paragraphs (k)(2) of this section, a maximum of 2.5 hours of training in a flight simulator or flight training device representing the category, class, and type, if applicable, of aircraft appropriate to the rating sought, may be credited toward the flight training time required by this section, if received from an authorized instructor.
  • Log 20 Hrs towards the Instrument Rating Section 61.65(e)(2). (e) Use of flight simulators or flight training devices. If the instrument training was provided by an authorized instructor in a flight simulator or flight training device 2) A maximum of 20 hours may be performed in that flight simulator or flight training device. Advanced Flight Training Device as used in this part, means a flight training device as defined in part 61 of this chapter that has a cockpit that accurately replicates a specific make, model, and type aircraft cockpit, and handling characteristics that accurately model the aircraft handling characteristics.
  • Recent Flight Experience–maintain currency Section 61.57(c)(1).
    • Combination of completing instrument experience in an aircraft and a flight simulator, flight training device, and aviation training device. A person who elects to complete the instrument experience with a combination of an aircraft, flight simulator or flight training device, and aviation training device must have performed and logged the following within the 6 calendar months preceding the month of the flight— (i) Instrument experience in an airplane, powered-lift, helicopter, or airship, as appropriate, for the instrument rating privileges to be maintained, performed in actual weather conditions, or under simulated weather conditions while using a view-limiting device, on the following instrument currency tasks.
    • (ii) Instrument experience in a flight simulator or flight training device that represents the category of aircraft for the instrument rating privileges to be maintained and involves performing at least the following tasks—
    • (iii) Instrument experience in an aviation training device that represents the category of aircraft for the instrument rating privileges to be maintained and involves performing at least the following tasks—
      (A) Six instrument approaches.    (B) Holding procedures and tasks.     (C) Interception and tracking courses through the use of navigational electronic systems.
  • Instrument Proficiency Check (partial) per FAA-S-8081-4 Instrument Flying Handbook.(latest version). Section 61.57(d)(l)(ii) (d) Instrument proficiency check. Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, a person who does not meet the instrument experience requirements of paragraph (c) of this section within the prescribed time, or within 6 calendar months after the prescribed time, may not serve as pilot in command under IFR or in weather conditions less than the minimums prescribed for VFR until that person passes an instrument proficiency check consisting of a representative number of tasks required by the instrument rating practical test. (1) The instrument proficiency check must be: (ii) For other than a glider, in a flight simulator or flight training device that is representative of the aircraft category.
  • Instrument Practical Test (partial) per FAA-S-8081-4 Instrument Flying Handbook. (latest version). Section 61.65(a)(8). (a) General. A person who applies for an instrument rating must: (8) Pass the required practical test on the areas of operation in paragraph (c) of this section in (i) An airplane, helicopter, or powered-lift appropriate to the rating sought; or (ii) A flight simulator or a flight training device appropriate to the rating sought and for the specific maneuver or instrument approach procedure performed. If an approved flight training device is used for the practical test, the instrument approach procedures conducted in that flight training device are limited to one precision and one nonprecision approach, provided the flight training device is approved for the procedure performed.
  • Log 50 Hrs towards the Commercial Certificate Section 61.129(i)(l)(i). (i) 50 hours in airplanes; and (1)100 hours in powered aircraft, of which 50 hours must be in airplanes. (i) Credit a maximum of 50 hours toward the total aeronautical experience requirements for an airplane or powered-lift rating, provided the aeronautical experience was obtained from an authorized instructor in a flight simulator or flight training device that represents that class of airplane or powered-lift category and type, if applicable, appropriate to the rating sought…
  • Log 25 Hrs towards the ATP Certificate Section 61.159(a)(3)(i). (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section, a person who is applying for an airline transport pilot certificate with an airplane category and class rating must have at least 1,500 hours of total time as a pilot that includes at least:(3) 75 hours of instrument flight time, in actual or simulated instrument conditions, subject to the following: (i) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(3)(ii) of this section, an applicant may not receive credit for more than a total of 25 hours of simulated instrument time in a flight simulator or flight training device.

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